LICORICE ROOT

  • $10.80


Ulcers, colic, gastritis, sore throat, bronchitis, bacterial/viral infections, diabetes insipidus, CFS, menopause, osteo-porosis/arthritis, lupus, high potassium,liver,  food poisoning, hypertonia, heartburn.

Licorice is taken by mouth for various digestive system complaints including stomach ulcers, heartburn, colic, and ongoing inflammation of the lining of the stomach (chronic gastritis).  Some people take licorice by mouth for sore throat, bronchitis, cough, and infections caused by bacteria or viruses.  The most common use of licorice world-wide is to treat coughs and colds. Licorice is especially useful for treating coughs with sticky phlegm, or for treating colds that accompany stomach upset

Licorice is also taken by mouth for Addison's disease, a type of diabetes caused by a hormone deficiency (diabetes insipidus), menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), liver disorders, malaria, tuberculosis, high potassium levels in the blood, food poisoning, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a condition in which there is too much muscle tone (hypertonia), abscesses, recovery after surgery, rash, high cholesterol.

Licorice is sometimes taken by mouth along with the herbs Panax ginseng and Bupleurum falcatum to improve the function of the adrenal glands, especially in people who have taken steroid drugs long-term. Steroids tend to suppress the activity of the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands produce important hormones that regulate the body's response to stress.

Licorice is also taken by mouth in combination with peony to increase fertility in women with a hormonal disorder called polycystic ovary syndrome, to treat people with abnormal levels of a hormone prolactin, for muscle cramps, and to reduce cancer pain. In combination with other herbs, licorice is also used to treat prostate cancer and the skin disorder known as eczema. Licorice is also taken in combination with andrographis, Siberian ginseng, and schisandra to treat familial Mediterranean fever. This hereditary condition is characterized by recurrent and painful swelling in the chest, stomach, or joints. A formulation containing licorice root along with slippery elm bark, lactulose, and oat bran has been used for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Preparations:  Teas, tinctures, and in encapsulations. The whole sticks and slices may be chewed straight and are pleasant tasting.

 Precautions:  Don't use licorice if you have high blood pressure, and don't use licorice if you eat a meat and potatoes diet. Your body needs potassium from fruit and vegetables to compensate for the excretion of potassium stimulated by licorice. If you use steroids or an asthma inhaler, licorice will increase both the effectiveness of the drug and the severity of its side effects. Its long term use is not recommended, and it is not recommended for use by pregnant women. May cause stomach upset if taken in large quantities.

 

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 For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  Disclaimer: Apple Tree makes no medical claims that the herbs, herbal products or suggested uses on this website are intended to diagnose, prevent, cure or treat any health problem or disease. Content herein is provided for informational purposes only.  Please do further research on your own.