Blessed Thistle

Blessed Thistle

  • $11.70


Blessed Thistle is used for loss of appetite and indigestioncoldsfever, bacterial infections, diarrheaa diuretic for increasing urine, for promoting the flow of breast milk in new mothers. The herb is also antibacterial. 

Blessed thistle is a plant. People use the flowering tops, leaves, and upper stems to make medicine. Blessed thistle was commonly used during the Middle Ages to treat the bubonic plague and as a tonic for monks.

Today, blessed thistle is prepared as a tea and used for loss of appetite and indigestion; and to treat coldscough, fever, bacterial infections, and diarrhea. It is also used as a diuretic for increasing urine output, and for promoting the flow of breast milk in new mothers.

Some people soak gauze in blessed thistle and apply it to the skin for treating boils, wounds, and ulcers.

In manufacturing, blessed thistle is used as a flavoring in alcoholic beverages.

Don’t confuse blessed thistle with milk thistle (Silybum marianum).

How does it work?

Blessed thistle contains tannins which might help diarrhea, coughs, and inflammation. However, there isn't enough information to know how well blessed thistle might work for many of its uses.

Modern herbal applications of blessed thistle are based on a long history of use in Europe and in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Blessed Thistle is used to treat digestive ailments fundamentally caused by insufficient secretion of stomach acid. The herb's bitter taste triggers a reflex reaction that releases gastric juices into the stomach, especially those needed to digest fats. For this reason, modern herbalists agree that the plant is helpful for loss of appetite, upset stomach, and gas, although it may be better to take the herb before these symptoms occur (such as before eating a fatty meal), rather than after. The herb is also antibacterial. 

 Precautions: Generally not recommended during pregnancy. If you are allergic to artichokes, avoid this herb. 

Typical Preparations: As a tea infusion, in capsules or as an extract, or externally as a poultice for boils and wounds. 

  

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  For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  Disclaimer: Apple Tree makes no medical claims that the herbs, herbal products or suggested uses on this website are intended to diagnose, prevent, cure or treat any health problem or disease. Content herein is provided for informational purposes only.  Please do further research on your own.